Quotes of John Milton

“ Where there is much desire to learn, there of necessity will be much arguing, much writing, many opinions; for opinions in good men is but knowledge in the making. ”

- John Milton

“ To be blind is not miserable; not to be able to bear blindness, that is miserable. ”

- John Milton

“ Gratitude bestows reverence, allowing us to encounter everyday epiphanies, those transcendent moments of awe that change forever how we experience life and the world. ”

- John Milton

“ He who reigns within himself, and rules passions, desires, and fears, is more than a king. ”

- John Milton

“ Solitude sometimes is best society. ”

- John Milton

“ They also serve who only stand and wait. ”

- John Milton

“ Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties. ”

- John Milton

“ The childhood shows the man, as morning shows the day. ”

- John Milton

“ What hath night to do with sleep? ”

- John Milton

“ Freely we serve Because we freely love, as in our will To love or not; in this we stand or fall. ”

- John Milton

“ The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.. ”

- John Milton

“ Awake, arise or be for ever fall’n. ”

- John Milton

“ How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh, and crabbed as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfet raigns. ”

- John Milton

“ The end then of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith makes up the highest perfection. ”

- John Milton

“ Be strong, live happy and love, but first of all Him whom to love is to obey, and keep His great command! ”

- John Milton

“ And of the sixth day yet remained There wanted yet the master work, the end Of all yet done: a creature who not prone And brute as other creatures but endued With sanctity of reason might erect His stature and, upright with front serene, Govern the rest, selfknowing, and from thence Magnanimous to correspond with Heaven, But grateful to acknowledge whence his good Descends, thither with heart and voice and eyes Directed in devotion to adore And worship God supreme who made him chief Of all His works. ”

- John Milton

“ How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh, and crabbed as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfet raigns. ”

- John Milton

“ No man [...] can be so stupid to deny that all men naturally were born free, being the image and resemblance of God himself. ”

- John Milton

“ He who thinks we are to pitch our tent here, and have attained the utmost prospect of reformation that the mortal glass wherein we contemplate can show us, till we come to beatific vision, that man by this very opinion declares that he is yet far short of truth. ”

- John Milton

“ I will not deny but that the best apology against false accusers is silence and sufferance, and honest deeds set against dishonest words. ”

- John Milton

“ What needs my Shakespeare for his honoured bones, The labor of an age in pilèd stones, Or that his hallowed relics should be hid Under a starypointing pyramid? Dear son of memory, great heir of fame, What need'st thou such weak witness of thy name? ”

- John Milton

“ And so sepúlchred in such pomp dost lie, That kings for such a tomb would wish to die. ”

- John Milton

“ How can I live without thee, how forego Thy sweet converse, and love so dearly joined, To live again in these wild woods forlorn? Should God create another Eve, and I Another rib afford, yet loss of thee Would never from my heart; no, no, I feel The link of nature draw me: flesh of flesh, Bone of my bone thou art, and from thy state Mine never shall be parted, bliss or woe. However, I with thee have fixed my lot, Certain to undergo like doom; if death Consort with thee, death is to me as life; So forcible within my heart I feel The bond of nature draw me to my own, My own in thee, for what thou art is mine; Our state cannot be severed, we are one, One flesh; to lose thee were to lose myself. ”

- John Milton

“ Such sweet compulsion doth in music lie. ”

- John Milton

“ Where the bright seraphim in burning row Their loud uplifted angel trumpets blow. ”

- John Milton

“ Immortal amarant, a flower which once In paradise, fast by the tree of life, Began to bloom; but soon for man's offence To heaven removed, where first it grew, there grows, And flowers aloft, shading the fount of life, And where the river of bliss through midst of heaven Rolls o'er elysian flowers her amber stream: With these that never fade the spirits elect Bind their resplendent locks. ”

- John Milton

“ Henceforth an individual solace dear; Part of my Soul I seek thee, and thee claim My other half: with that thy gentle hand Seisd mine, I yielded, and from that time see How beauty is excelld by manly grace. ”

- John Milton

“ Here at last We shall be free; the Almighty hath not built Here for his envy, will not drive us hence: Here we may reign secure, and in my choice To reign is worth ambition though in Hell: Better to reign in Hell, than serve in Heaven. ”

- John Milton

“ Farewell Hope, and with Hope farewell Fear ”

- John Milton

“ Consult.../what reinforcement we may gain from hope,/If not, what resolution from despair. ”

- John Milton
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