Quotes of Jane Austen

“ An agreeable manner may set off handsome features, but can never alter plain ones. ”

- Jane Austen

“ There is hardly any personal defect which an agreeable manner might not gradually reconcile one to. ”

- Jane Austen

“ In every power, of which taste is the foundation, excellence is pretty fairly divided between the sexes. ”

- Jane Austen

“ Family connexions were always worth preserving, good company always worth seeking. ”

- Jane Austen

“ Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love. ”

- Jane Austen

“ Good company requires only birth, education, and manners, and with regard to education is not very nice. Birth and good manners are essential; but a little learning is by no means a dangerous thing in good company; on the contrary, it will do very well. ”

- Jane Austen

“ Here and there, human nature may be great in times of trial; but generally speaking, it is its weakness and not its strength that appears in a sick chamber: it is selfishness and impatience rather than generosity and fortitude, that one hears of. There is so little real friendship in the world! and unfortunately, there are so many who forget to think seriously till it is almost too late. ”

- Jane Austen

“ My idea of good company is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company. ”

- Jane Austen

“ She felt that she could so much more depend upon the sincerity of those who sometimes looked or said a careless or a hasty thing, than of those whose presence of mind never varied, whose tongue never slipped. ”

- Jane Austen

“ To flatter and follow others, without being flattered and followed in turn, is but a state of half enjoyment. ”

- Jane Austen

“ Facts or opinions which are to pass through the hands of so many, to be misconceived by folly in one, and ignorance in another, can hardly have much truth left. ”

- Jane Austen

“ I pay very little regard...to what any young person says on the subject of marriage. If they profess a disinclination for it, I only set it down that they have not yet seen the right person. ”

- Jane Austen

“ I would rather have young people settle on a small income at once, and have to struggle with a few difficulties together, than be involved in a long engagement. ”

- Jane Austen

“ Knowing their feelings as she did, it was a most attractive picture of happiness to her. She always watched them as long as she could, delighted to fancy she understood what they might be talking of, as they walked along in happy independence, or equally delighted to see the Admiral's hearty shake of the hand when he encountered an old friend, and observe their eagerness of conversation when occasionally forming into a little knot of the navy, Mrs Croft looking as intelligent and keen as any of the officers around her. ”

- Jane Austen

“ The only time I ever really suffered in body or mind, the only time that I ever fancied myself unwell, or had any ideas of danger, was the winter that I passed by myself. As long as we could be together, nothing ever ailed me, and I never met with the smallest inconvenience. ”

- Jane Austen

“ When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other's ultimate comfort. ”

- Jane Austen

“ If any one faculty of our nature may be called more wonderful than the rest, I do think it is memory. There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities of memory, than in any other of our intelligences. The memory is sometimes so retentive, so serviceable, so obedient; at others, so bewildered and so weak; and at others again, so tyrannic, so beyond control! We are, to be sure, a miracle every way; but our powers of recollecting and of forgetting do seem peculiarly past finding out. ”

- Jane Austen

“ I hate to hear you talking so like a fine gentleman, and as if women were all fine ladies, instead of rational creatures. ”

- Jane Austen

“ We certainly do not forget you as soon as you forget us. It is, perhaps, our fate rather than our merit. We cannot help ourselves. We live at home, quiet, confined, and our feelings prey upon us. You are forced on exertion. You have always a profession, pursuits, business of some sort or other, to take you back into the world immediately, and continual occupation and change soon weaken impressions. All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one; you need not covet it), is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone. ”

- Jane Austen

“ A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of. ”

- Jane Austen

“ One cannot fix one's eyes on the commonest natural production without finding food for a rambling fancy. ”

- Jane Austen

“ It was the misfortune of poetry to be seldom safely enjoyed by those who enjoyed it completely; and that the strong feelings which alone could estimate it truly were the very feelings which ought to taste it but sparingly. ”

- Jane Austen

“ To sit in the shade on a fine day, and look upon verdure is the most perfect refreshment. ”

- Jane Austen

“ Everybody likes to go their own way--to choose their own time and manner of devotion. ”

- Jane Austen

“ It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation. ”

- Jane Austen

“ One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering. ”

- Jane Austen

“ Oh! Do not attack me with your watch. A watch is always too fast or too slow. I cannot be dictated to by a watch. ”

- Jane Austen

“ One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other. ”

- Jane Austen

“ I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve. ”

- Jane Austen

“ To love is to burn, to be on fire. ”

- Jane Austen
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31
  • 32
  • 33
  • 34
  • 35
  • 36
  • 37